Message in a Bottle

6:02:00 PM

“Things changed, people changed, and the world went rolling along right outside the window.”

I will keep it short since I did not find this Nicholas Sparks creation particularly special. (Yes, that first line would be the summary of this entire review.)

Message in the Bottle is Mr Sparks' follow-up effort to the well-loved novel-turned-movie The Notebook. Most of the book centered on the main characters' long-distance relationship, which began when middle-aged columnist and single mother Theresa Osborne found a bottle containing one of the most touching love letters she's ever read, washed up on the shore during a seaside vacation. Driven by curiosity, Theresa for a few days dropped her busy life in Boston to find out personally who Garrett is. The main characters hit it off in less than a day of meeting each other and from there began a whirlwind love affair challenged not only by distance, but by differing lifestyles and past loves.

I began reading Message in a Bottle immediately after Zombies vs Unicorns. I finished it in a day, not because it had a very engaging story but because it was very easy to read. But I found the plot quite dragging and predictable. There weren't anything particularly striking about the main characters. In fact, I found Theresa very annoying and it was unfortunate that even at the ending there was no retribution for this character. If it weren't in my 2012 reading list, I would have been completely discouraged to finish this book because it was almost as if I can hear Theresa in my head, lol. I expected a little more from this book because aside from being a Sparks novel (I loved Dear John), it was also recommended by a friend. Meh.

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"Now the trouble about trying to make yourself stupider than you really are is that you very often succeed."
CS Lewis

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